Counseling Services Program--#2
Assessment, Evaluation and Analysis
- Steinhatchee -

Evaluation Topics
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Pre / Post Evaluation

PART IV:  COUNSELOR PRE / POST EVALUATION

Counselor Rating Index

Functioning PRE Treatment

The counselor evaluation of pre-treatment and post-treatment psycho-social functioning.  The counselor evaluation of the youth's level of psycho-social functioning (pre and post intervention) is a self-administered assessment (completed by the counselor) that identifies to what degree social, occupational and academic function existed on the first day of counseling services, compared to the degree of functioning at the last day of counseling services.  The youth assessed were those who were in the program at the end of the contract period.  The counselor evaluation is based upon clinical interpretations at the program begin date and at the program end date, linked to individual case records, which includes historical clinical observations, assessments, and interventions for each case for the duration of the contract period.  These clinical case reviews were indexed into one of six areas in the counselor assessment.   

The "counselor rating index" (CRI) is comprised of a program specific 6-point Likert response set, developed in relationship to the Global Assessment of Functioning GAF Scores, commonly used by U.S. mental health professionals.  GAF is outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
2, published by the American Psychological Association (DSM-IV TR, 2003, p. 34).  It is important to note that the GAF Scale was not directly used in this evaluation, but rather a trimmed down comparative "counselor rating index (CRI)" was designed and used.  The author of this report acknowledges that GAF categories are broken down by 10-point segments, thus 20-point ranges (seen below in the left hand column) means that the author merged two categories of GAF for the sake of an equitable comparison with the CRI.  The comparison of the CRI with the GAF Scale is highlighted below. 

Functioning POST Treatment

Part IV: Cost Comparison

Costs: Private vs. Contract

Additional Eval Topics

For more information
related to the counseling services program, or to find out if counseling services can begin in your school or school district contact us.

Assessment, Evaluation and Analysis for
Counseling Services
Program #1
(Same Data)

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Psychosocial functioning addresses multiple areas of clinical concern in the provision of mental health services.  Scores are not necessarily indicative of mental disorders, even if the scores (GAF or CRI) are low.  Biological factors, substance use, as well as situational and environmental variables are useful in assessing for mental illness, but theses scores are not the only variables that are used to do so.  For the purposes of this evaluation mental illness was not necessarily the assessment variable measured in the CRI, but it was not excluded either - rather the degrees of functioning were measured pre intervention and post intervention.   

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The pie chart above reveals the number of youth who began the counseling services program (pre-counseling) and the level of counselor assessed psychosocial functioning.  It is important to note that a score of 3 or below would indicate the need for professional intervention. Youth who score at a zero were likely in need of more intense services than those services provided in the school setting.  Pre-counseling numbers are useful, especially when they are compared to post-counseling data, to highlight psychosocial changes before and after treatment.

PROGRAM EVALUATION NOTE:  Regardless of the equivalency limitation between CRI and GAF, when pre and post psychosocial functioning from the counselor perspective is compared and contrasted to the students' grades at time one and time two, and when the CRI functioning scores are compared and contrasted to the administrations survey responses related to youth improvement and youth regression, in addition to a review of the students' exit interview questions of likes and dislikes program evaluation and instrument reliability and validity is strengthened.  Further, validity is strengthened when these findings are duplicated in another academic setting, involving different youth in a different community, with a different administration.  Equivalency has not been assessed in review of the CRI and the GAF, in part because the CRI was developed for the sake of convenience and ease of use, as opposed to the use of the well-known GAF Scale. 

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The pie chart above indicates the changes, if any, in the counselor assessed levels of psychosocial functioning at the end of the counseling program (post-counseling).  It is possible for some youth to regress, thus lower numbers from pre to post test are not necessarily surprising.  However, overall improvement percentages might be strengthened when compared to the administrative reports of improvement (by percent) in "part III" of this report.         

PROGRAM EVALUATION NOTE:  Equivalency has not been assessed in review of the CRI and the GAF, in part because the CRI was developed for the sake of convenience and ease of use, as opposed to the use of the well known GAF Scale.  Regardless of the equivalency limitation between CRI and GAF, when pre and post psychosocial functioning from the counselor perspective is compared and contrasted to the students' grades at time one and time two, and when the CRI functioning scores are compared and contrasted to the administrations survey responses related to youth improvement and youth regression, in addition to a review of the students' exit interview questions of likes and dislikes program evaluation and instrument reliability and validity is strengthened.  Further, validity is strengthened when these findings are duplicated in another academic setting, involving different youth in a different community, with a different administration. 

PART V:  PROGRAM COST COMPARISON

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Program efficacy is a good indication as to the need for services, however affordability is a consideration as well.  The next two graphs indicate what mental health services cost in the community when provided by private practitioners using fees that the market allows, what the services actually cost under the counseling services program contract agreement, and what additional costs might be included if "support services" were provided at the full private practice billing rate.  These "support services" costs were calculated, based upon a daily average of times such services were actually provided in the school during the contract period, including the private practice rate that would be charged for such support services in the private sector, and then to reach the daily fee these numbers were averaged out in relationship to how many days the services were actually provided in the life of the contract.  In summary, the graph is a comparison actual contract costs to possible private sector costs.  One of the dollar values (blue) is actual, whereas the others (maroon and yellow) are figurative based upon certain community based scenarios.

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The Contract Rate vs. Private Practice Rate chart includes there columns: 1) the actual rate charged (blue) to the district for each day of service provided under the terms of the contract, 2) the average daily rate (maroon) that would normally be billed for similar services if they were provided in private practice (including an average daily amount for Support Services) and 3) a brief breakdown of the average daily amount for support services (yellow), based upon the average number of times that similar services were provided to the school during the existing contract period.  The private rate was figured by calculating the average number of hours spent doing various tasks each day while at the school during the past year - multiplied by the hourly rate for individual, group and family sessions, with the hourly rate for support services also being factored into the private party average daily rate.  Remember that "support services" was defined in Part I of this evaluation as "…meetings with principals, teachers, parents, school resource officers, guidance counselors, case managers, and it includes counselor attendance at IEP and study team meetings (see Part I, "Service Break Down…" section).  In the final estimate, the daily cost for services that are being provided under the contract to the district is $350, whereas in the same case if such services were provided in the private practice sector, the same services would realistically jump to nearly $700 per day.  The next variable to consider in a cost analysis of the counseling services program is the annual cost differences based upon the academic year that just ended.

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Additional Evaluation Topics
| COSTS: Contract vs. Private--Savings |
|SUMMARY: Limitations and Credits |

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